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Middle School by Cole

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I too was saddened to see it end. Cole, you need to think sequel. You need to get these guys into high school. From what I've read, it's the only way you're going to satisfy the hoard outside your door.

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Oh, how silly. I guess I did read at least part of this thread seeing as how I already made a post. :icon6:

Anyway, this was a completely charming story, and funny of course. Crotchal area? So cute, 'in a heffalump sort of way'. Great silly moments.

I loved the way Chad challenged Marc, both in subtle ways and in encouraging him to rewrite the English assignment. It was interesting to watch Marc's progression from the 'maybe gay' kid to the kid who could write that paper, even if he was sort of afraid to let anyone read it.

I was definitely caught off guard when Chad said he was going to a different high school. I was totally expecting him to come out at that point. What ended up happening was much more creative, and I shouldn't have expected less from you, Cole.

I had to imagine a kiss at the end though! :hehe:

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I knew that was typing I heard, Cole! From your comment, I'll now try to identify the

"backspace" key in it all....

But now I'm reminded that i'm waiting, and I like to let that beast sleep!

Tracy

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...and I like to let that beast sleep!

*Yawn, strech* What?

Maybe Cole could give us a sequel as Chad and Mark go to their new high school.

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Hello James, that's an interesting idea--I have my doubts anyone can "get" Cole

to do anything, but all you guys are welcome to try. I'll stay in the background,

cheering you on, as I seem to aggrivate him enough. Imagine that...

Hi Cole, I wouldn't want to aggrivate you by talking about you like you're not here. :icon6:

Remember guys, you write, i'll read.

Tracy

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I would absolutely love to see a sequel to this story, but as an author, I recognize that it would not be an easy one to write, and would undoubtedly leave some people disappointed. Some things are much better left to the imagination, but Cole, I won't argue with you one bit if you do decide to write a sequel.

Marc and Chad at Madison High . . . hmmm. Well, they've be boyfriends, now, but both obviously still very attractive to the girls. They'll obviously still be best friends, but the first big question from Cole's standpoint, and it's a huge one that would dictate the entire story, is whether or not they should come out, and if so, when. Cole could have a lot of fun with the whole "in the closet" scenario, but he's already done that in Middle School, and Cole's not one to rehash a story. I can't picture these guys being the type to lead girls on to keep a cover. Cole really hasn't done anything with the "out and proud" genre - that's actually more my territory, albeit I tend to be an idealist. Suppose Cole does have them enter high school as an out but not necessarily proud couple. No major fights and no serious drama - just two teens trying to fit in. There's a lot he could do with that style, but it would be new territory for Cole.

One last comment - Cole, you seriously expect us to believe Chad would even think about asking his parents if it's OK to have sex? Are you serious? When WBMS was my editor, he made the point, very strongly I might add, that teens do not ask their parents about sex - at least not voluntarily!

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Cole, you seriously expect us to believe Chad would even think about asking his parents if it's OK to have sex? Are you serious? When WBMS was my editor, he made the point, very strongly I might add, that teens do not ask their parents about sex - at least not voluntarily!

I was very vociferous about it. Kids do not ask their parents if it's okay to have sex. Kids are very awkward about it and most just do it. Very few discuss it with their parents. It's not normal (this is not a gay/straight thing but a TEEN thing).

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After School Conversations

A dialog, by DesDownunder.

Place: A suburban home near you.

Time: 4.25pm.

"Hi mom, I'm home."

"Did you have a nice day at school, dear?"

"Same old, same old. Boring teachers, stupid bullies, hot gym bunnies, sexy cheer leaders, hunky football players. Did you now that tennis shorts reveal more thigh when the player jumps, than when he runs? And do you remember Allen, the cute blond kid that use to live next door?"

"Yes dear, I remember him and both his tall, blond, tanned, Swedish parents. They were lifesavers, weren't they?"

"Yes they were, Allen's parents are paramedics now, and they were all at school today giving the class demonstrations on mouth to mouth resuscitation. But the best thing was, they were only wearing really tight skimpy Speedos. We had to choose a partner and practice lifesaving on each other."

"That's nice dear. How did you do? Did you pass the course?"

"Well not at first, because the teacher wanted me to give her mouth to mouth, and I didn't do that very well until she let me practice with that really tall dark boy, Enrico, who just arrived from Italy. He always seems to be in a state of arousal and he has really nice full rounded wet lips which he keeps moist by running his long tongue over them...Mom? where are you going?"

"Mom? That's strange she's gone to her bedroom."

He turned just in time to see his father walking in the door.

"Hi Dad."

"Hi son, where is your mother?"

"She has gone to the bedroom."

"Why, son?"

"I don't know, I was just telling her about my day at school with the Hendricksons, do you remember them?"

"Yes I do, they lived next door, they are paramedics."

"Well they came to school to show us how to give mouth to mouth resuscitation, and I had to practice with the teacher."

"You practiced mouth to mouth with Miss Tyston, the brunette who wears the low cut t-shirts?"

"Yes Dad, but I did it better with Enrico."

"You kissed...I mean, you gave Enrico, the muscle bound Italian kid with the deep olive complexion and the curling pouting lips...you practised mouth to mouth with him after you made out...er practiced with Miss Tyston"

"Yes Dad, is it okay if I go and jerk off now before dinner?"

"Do what ever you want son, I'm going to lay down in the bedroom, with your mother."

(I think I will post this in FlashFiction, too.) :hug:

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From Wibby:

I was very vociferous about it. Kids do not ask their parents if it's okay to have sex. Kids are very awkward about it and most just do it. Very few discuss it with their parents. It's not normal (this is not a gay/straight thing but a TEEN thing).

From Altimexis:

One last comment - Cole, you seriously expect us to believe Chad would even think about asking his parents if it's OK to have sex? Are you serious? When WBMS was my editor, he made the point, very strongly I might add, that teens do not ask their parents about sex - at least not voluntarily!

I can give you three explanations why Chad said he'd have to ask his parents if it was OK if they had sex in his bedroom.

1. He was trying to get a shocked reaction from Marc, but Marc just jumped right over it.

2. He was being sarcastic, and expected Marc to be sarcastic right back, leading them into a discussion about having sex.

3. Chad is one of those kids who have a close and trusting relationship with their parents. They tell them things, and discuss things, because they're not ashamed of who they are and how they behave, and because their parents are very supportive. In the past, when they had their talk as he entered puberty, his parents had set up rules about what he could and couldn't do in his room with a girl. They hadn't discussed what could be done with a boy, and so Chad is wondering what the rules will be in that situation.

Many parents have to decide, when they learn their son is gay, just what the rules are for entertaining other boys in their bedrooms. The rules are different.

I'll allow you both to choose the reason he said what he said from this list. It's one of these. I left it ambiguous. I like to think you know both these characters pretty well now, and should know why they do what they do.

And I totally reject the idea that practically no teen discusses sex with their parents. That's simply not so. I might agree that the majority find it awkward and try to avoid it. But it isn't true that almost none of them ever do it. Sex education in the schools has made a huge difference in how teens talk to each other about sex, and to their parents if the parents themselves aren't embarrassed about it. Kids will talk frankly about it if you speak to them non judgmentally and maturely. That, my friends, is an absolute fact.

C

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All three went through my mind as I read the story, but I probably settled on No 3.

My working with younger people has revealed a wide range of reaction to attempts at frankness in discussion on nearly every subject you could name, including sex. Some cannot discuss it, some can't stop talking about it.

What I do find too in support of Cole, is that if you show no embarrassment or ridicule in discussion then yes the young are likely to open up and talk freely.

However, there is a natural tendency in teens and even young adults to not talk about sex with their parents. The thought of your parents 'doing it' is enough to disturb most teens in most cultures. It occurs where the predominant cultural taboo is to conceal sex from the young until 'the talk' is given. Even then, further discussion is often restricted.

Wider sex education in schools has often meant the kids understand more about sex than their parents, giving rise to the old joke about a parent saying to his child, that he wants to talk to him about sex and the child responding with, "Sure Dad, what did you want to know?"

I still see a lot of embarrassment on sex discussions in families. Mainly it is the parents, but the kids detect that embarrassment and also feel inhibited because of it.

I certainly agree that things are more open away from the parents both for the teens and non-family adults, but I have talked with students (mostly straight) who express surprise at how openly one of their fellow students can talk with their own parents.

Still I am an Australia and I think some people still get married here, with a view to either planting a cabbage patch, or creating a landing strip for the stork to deliver the baby. :hug:

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Teens do not discuss HAVING SEX with their parents. Some teens might discuss sex in an abstract way with their parents. No teen EVER asks permission to have sex.

I think the conversation would go differently from that. It does seem unlikely that a teen would say, "Hey, Mom, Jody's coming over tonight. Is it OK if we mess around in my room?" I think the teen would be more inclined to ask what the house rules were for when his boyfriend was visiting, and perhaps when they were having sleepovers. Then, the parent would probably look at the maturity and age of the child, what he's aware that has happened in the past between the two, and certainly at his own hangups, and respond accordingly.

Some kids are very close to their parents. It's usually in households where communication is practiced and has been practiced since the kid(s) were young. It's also in households were there is mutual respect between the generations.

Hey, you don't have to believe me. But it does happen. However, if you dismiss this totally, I think we have the wrong person with the ostrich avatar.

:hug:

C

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James, I've been asked to write a sequel for almost every story I've written. I even started one once for Josh, Evolving, as those kids had lots of unfinished business.

My problem was, I found my heart wasn't in it. I'm delighted people fall in love with my characters, as much so, I think, as I myself do. But I have a problem writing sequels. It has to do with how I write.

I get a great deal of pleasure out of the entire process of writing. As you know, it's a very involved process, involving thinking up a message you want to share with readers, then a plot that will enable you to illustrate that in a dramatic fashion, then characters who will be compelling and captivating and work within the structure of the plot. All that is difficult and takes a lot of thought and imagination and working out of problems. It's also something I've found to be lots of fun. You have to be creative to write well, but you must be just as creative, maybe more so, planning what you're going to write. I enjoy the snot out of that activity. Just thinking, then solving all the multitude of problems that occur to you, problems that screech at you and say, "You can't do that, dummy! That won't work."

So I get the plot figured out, as far as I figure them out in advance. I don't outline my stories. I do figure out how they'll begin, approximately how they'll end, and what point I'm trying to make that will make the venture worthwhile. Then, at that point, I get to start thinking about characters.

And I like that part about best of all. Because I'm breathing life into people that didn't exist before I thought them up. That's kind of wonderful.

But see, if I write sequels, I don't get to do that. I've already created those characters. I've usually drawn them in great detail. All I have left do to with them, then, in a sequel, is put them in new circumstances and see how they react. I have a feeling, if they're true to who they are, how they act will be pretty predictable.

And I don't ever what to be predictable. And I don't want to be robbed of the joy of that breathing life into new characters part. I especially don't want to be robbed of that.

So I don't write sequels. But you can't imagine how flattered I am that people ask. Because I know what that means, and I'm humbled by it.

So thanks so much for asking. But I probably won't be doing it any time soon. Unless I run out of ideas. And that hasn't happened yet.

Cole

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James, I've been asked to write a sequel for almost every story I've written. . . .

And I like that part about best of all. Because I'm breathing life into people that didn't exist before I thought them up. That's kind of wonderful.

But see, if I write sequels, I don't get to do that. . . . And I don't want to be robbed of the joy of that breathing life into new characters part. . . . So I don't write sequels.

I dont' know. I mean, I certainly understand how you feel, Cole. I really understand how you feel. I never intended for Broad Ripple Blues to be more than a simple short story, but then I had the idea to write an addition to it, and the Naptown Tales series was born, and I've kept on adding and adding to it. Perhaps it's different because it has been an open-ended project - at least until I decided to put a cap on it in the summer of next year. The amazing thing is that the latest story in the series, Summer Internship, which I just started posting, is nearly as long as my first novel, Love in a Chair!

But getting back to the idea of breathing new life into characters, I don't think that writing sequels changes that at all, particularly when we're talking about teenagers. My characters have evolved from story to story, and matured considerably as they've aged. David, my first protagonist, was barely fourteen when the series started, and he's now sixteen in the current story. There's a world of difference between his character at fourteen and his character at sixteen. We all change as we age, so just because you've written about a character doesn't mean they're set in stone.

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I'm not sure whether it's customary to recognize a "Pick from the Past" here, nor whether the way to do it is by resurrecting the original thread for the story . . . but I just wanted to say that I enjoyed "Middle School" just as much this time around. Actually, while I'm pretty sure I read it the first time around, enough time had passed that it seemed new to me (again) this time, which is even better. A charming story with a terrific finale.

R

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I had not come across this story before but found it delightful and entertaining. I can understand why Cole is proud of it. I can also understand why people have asked for a sequel, though I also understand why it has not be written.

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I think if a reader is going to dig in the archives for an example of the kind of story we all like to see here on the site then Cole's work is the place to begin. I cannot remember the first Cole Parker story I read but I do know that Middle School was one of the first.

We all have memories of our school days...some of you are still in school...but the visions of kids in the hall seems to come alive in this story. Thanks Cole, this story should be on the list for each new reader on the AD site...and at least one of us looks back and realizes what a geek I was in middle school. (oops, did I say that out loud?)

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"I think if a reader is going to dig in the archives for an example of the kind of story we all like to see..."

"This story should be on the list for each new reader on the AD site..."

This way of thinking is interesting to me... Perhaps we could form some sort of "Introduction to AwesomeDude" section, where we could potentially nominate stories that we think are representative of AwesomeDude as a whole that a new reader could look at without having to "dig through the archives". Though it would be difficult to be fair in determining which stories would be included and which ones wouldn't be.

Edit: Now that I think about it, I suppose "Dude's picks from the past" already accomplishes this purpose to some degree.

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