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I was sitting at my desk this morning letting my mind wonder (procrastinating), while half heartedly flicking through the AD website, and i began to wonder.

How many people, poets, authours, the musical coner of the website, and anyone else i've missed out. how many of you consider yourselfs as artists?

If so/not, then why aren/aren't you an artist?

I pondered this and decided that i never saw myself as an artist. allways seen myself as someone with absolutly 0 creative talent what so ever... and therefor don't see myself as an artist... i wonder aobut everyone else?

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I suspect I have always thought of myself as a creative person. My dictionary defines artist as a creative person with a description of the noun, "Artist (noun): A person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination."

Of course, just because I regard myself an artist or a creative person, doesn't mean I am very good at it, but it is the way I think of myself. What's more, I think everyone has the ability to be an artist, a creative person. Creativity is part of the essence of being human, whether it is making something, or appreciating the work of others.

I must add that I have never been happy about the general thought that an artist only 'paints or sculpts'. For me this is a narrow definition that leaves out other creative activities, it denies people the recognition of their very real creative potential.

Art, as a word, is very much considered to refer to paintings and in many communities there is quite a challenge to convince the established circles of art appreciation that 'art' can have a much wider reference encompassing many disciplines and crafts.

I grew up under the influence of classical art in the widest sense. I was taught the History of Art which included the artistic attitude of ancient and modern cultures; from cavemen drawings to electronic compositions.

However little else comes close to understanding the culmination of the creative attitude as found in the now considered, old fashioned term, "The Poetic Life."

But again that phrase has a narrow definition and a wider one. The poetic life can be one led by a poet who writes poetry, or by a person who sees and hears a poem in everything. Such a person may write poetry, or compose songs, music, or sculpt, paint, or write novels, plays or even essays of consideration, reflection and explore enlightening thoughts. Such a person may merely appreciate the creative ability of others and I would still consider them living the Poetic Life.

So for me the artist, has never been someone who just paints, I think of the artist as someone who unlocks the spirit of life itself and in so doing, enables all of us to see, hear, feel, taste, touch or even smell the essence of being alive. An artist captures moments that we would otherwise miss, he gives meaning to life where, before his creativity, there was only despair; he provides insight into that despair and to joy, as well as understanding that life itself is an act of creativity from which our potential evolves. An artist takes his passion for his craft and uses his talent to reveal the passion of living itself, and in so done may reach the discovery of compassion in all the studies (the arts) of our understanding both the real and the unknowable.

To some people this will all seem airy-fairy, overblown romanticism, elitist and even useless. For many people, art and creative work has become nothing more than just another way of earning a living, in much the same way that sportsmanship has simply become a way to profit from the athletes' skill and talent in sport.

In sport and art, competition to be the best, to be the winner, has corrupted the access to beauty that both can provide, for the sake of money and profit.

In the ancient world, everyone was an artist, an artist of living and of Loving. We seem to have, not lost this, as much as we deny it lest we reveal our true sensitivity to love and life, and thereby become prone to ridicule by cretinous attitude.

Every moment of every day is an opportunity to be an artist, to live life to the fullest, to see a poem in every tree, to breathe love into life and accept the breath it returns to you in its kiss.

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I think of myself as being creative, and sensitive to what's around me. I don't think of myself as an artist. It's simply not a term I'd ever think to apply to myself.

I was a professional musician earlier in life, and considered creating music with depth and feeling an artistic endeavor. As I was interpreting other people's musical ideas, I was creating something anew that someone else had imagined. That, to me was more artistic than writing is. Writing, to me, is pure creation.

C

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I think that there are some people that are driven to create.

For me whether it is building a computer out of parts or digging, preparing and planting a new flower bed or writing, it's a real rush for me to create something that was never there before. Something that came from my mind and imagination that adds something, no matter how small, to the world.

That to me is immortality. Not sitting around on clouds with nekked angels and playing a harp. Sure that would be fun for a while but unless I was creating something I'd be bored as hell.

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I believe art exists when a maker endows a creation with an aesthetic quality, recognizable by others, that surpasses the everyday.

Any human activity can be achieved with this quality.

Pitching a perfect game is an artform, and the pitcher who accomplishes that feat is an artist.

James Merkin

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I see myself as an engineer, craftsman, and writer. I've never really thought of myself as an artist, probably because of the rather unusual behavioral connotations associates with arteests (spelling intentionally changed). Although, having read Des' earlier post, I guess I can see his point that the act of creating is inherently art-y.

Rick

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I see myself as an engineer, craftsman, and writer. I've never really thought of myself as an artist, probably because of the rather unusual behavioral connotations associates with arteests (spelling intentionally changed). Although, having read Des' earlier post, I guess I can see his point that the act of creating is inherently art-y.

Rick

Most followers of the 'Poetic' or Arty life would likely consider the so called, "arteests" as affected phonies, posing for notoriety, even if they are gifted.

Yet, and it is very necessary to understand this; the artistic temperament expressed as a preposterously pretentious caricature has been, and in some cultures still is, the only way a flamboyant, or an ostentatious, or an outwardly creative person can survive.

Mainstream society has generally been tolerant of the more, shall I say, outgoing personality, if the general population does not feel threatened by such a personality. Is it possible to feel threatened by those who are seemingly harmless because of their mannerisms, or as Rick describes them: because of their, "unusual behavioral connotations"?

Unfortunately, for every group of people who accept unusual behavior, there is another group who insist on trying to eradicate those mannerisms or the people who exhibit them, simply because they cannot even tolerate anything different to their own way of thinking.

The fact that these mannerisms themselves, alienate many people is not denied, and indeed it is part of the problem of attaining equality for freedom of (self-)expression as well as recognising that such differences between individuals, or races, do not need to be feared.

I am of course not making a case here for tolerating fascist or extremist mindsets, bent on controlling or dominating others. Those tyrants limit freedom, and impose restrictions on the freedom to create; they fail the test of recognising Human Rights, and as such need not be included in our endeavours for acceptance of the diversity of individual personalities or cultures.

Art in its widest sense is a way of life, a philosophy (of art) if you like, that goes beyond mannerisms, even if its followers are somewhat extroverted in manner, and it is a philosophy which sees the richness of artistic temperament in all of us to at least some degree, even if we as individuals are not fully cognisant of it.

Some people might consider themselves to be craftsmen, technicians who appreciate and even practice art, while others see themselves as artists who utilise technical knowledge and craftsmanship. These attitudes are often determined by the passion and abilities of our talents, whatever they are. The more we practice our craft the more the artist grows within us and the artist by definition, creates.

Creativity is what we humans do, and it becomes art, as Merkin says, if it can surpass the everyday when it can be recognised as being endowed with the quality inherent in the aesthetic.

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So for me the artist, has never been someone who just paints, I think of the artist as someone who unlocks the spirit of life itself and in so doing, enables all of us to see, hear, feel, taste, touch or even smell the essence of being alive. An artist captures moments that we would otherwise miss, he gives meaning to life where, before his creativity, there was only despair; he provides insight into that despair and to joy, as well as understanding that life itself is an act of creativity from which our potential evolves. An artist takes his passion for his craft and uses his talent to reveal the passion of living itself, and in so done may reach the discovery of compassion in all the studies (the arts) of our understanding both the real and the unknowable.

Reading this i feel like a phoney, to some extent.

The meaning behind this fits though. It must be said that the label (for in modern society thats what it is) of artist, doesn't quite do your explaination justice. maybe this has more to do with the effect the label has had on me more than acctually sitting there and 'objectivly' considering the meaning of being an artist.

would it be completly naive of me to say that artists are trying to 'complete' themselfs with thier art? - what ever form it may take - striving to as you say unlock the passion of living? perhaps people are cloests to perfection when they are creating?

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Reading this i feel like a phoney, to some extent.

The meaning behind this fits though. It must be said that the label (for in modern society thats what it is) of artist, doesn't quite do your explaination justice. maybe this has more to do with the effect the label has had on me more than acctually sitting there and 'objectivly' considering the meaning of being an artist.

would it be completly naive of me to say that artists are trying to 'complete' themselfs with thier art? - what ever form it may take - striving to as you say unlock the passion of living? perhaps people are cloests to perfection when they are creating?

Gee, Sign of a Flatline, I don't think my intention was to make anyone feel "like a phoney." And certainly the depth of thought in your reply and your poem, tells me you are anything but a phony.

As for asking if, "artists are trying to 'complete' themselves with their art?" I can accept that as a valid view.

I think I was trying to say that we sometimes confine our definition of the artist to that of an amusing entertainer without realising the historical and philosophical consequences of the creative spirit that drives mankind. That these effects can be passive, as in those who appreciate the artist and his work, as wells as active, in that they create as artists themselves, should lead us to see that most of us fluctuate between these two all the time.

Think in terms of the art of loving, and the giving and receiving that is inherent in a love affair. When love is absent, we see the giving and receiving as phony manipulation for a selfish end result, as distinct from the artists being driven to complete themselves so that they may share their love, their passion, their art.

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would it be completely naive of me to say that artists are trying to 'complete' themselves with their art? - what ever form it may take - striving to as you say unlock the passion of living? perhaps people are closest to perfection when they are creating?

Not naive at all. You've got my motive banged to rights ... though I'm not sure about the perfection bit. :icon_twisted:

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I'm pretty sure I can call myself as having artistic capability :wink:

When I was a kid and all through High School, I drew the best in my class.

And if not the best then second best. It was never a problem to me to create drawings. :hehe:

I remember people telling me that I should go to an art school

and become a painter or something like that.

Of course, that's not something my parents would tolerate :sad:

Because of the "Starving Artist" and all that...

I wanted to became an architect. Drawing and designing buildings.

Not good enough... :sad:

I ended up being an IT/Computer Scientist... :omg:

Oh well, not bad. Especially since now I'm doing postgraduate courses.

That's is why I can say that I have artistic capability but will never be an artist :cry:

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Rad, nice to see you posting again. :wink:

I think many of us can relate to the situation you describe.

Undiscovered talent, or talent that never gets the break or encouragement that it deserves is unfortunately, more common than it should be.

However that doesn't mean your life can't be full of creativity, and being creative means you are an artist.

If painting and design is what you like doing, then you can always take them up as a hobby, and who knows where that will lead?

:hehe:

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