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Countries that Criminalize Homosexuality More Likely to Search for Gay Porn

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http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/belief/2014/jan/10/uganda-homophobic-googling-gay-porn

These figures also demonstrate a high degree of correlation between places of conservative religious practice and internet searches for gay porn.

Remember when Colorado decided that it was in their best interest to legalize marijuana rather than waste time and money enforcing a law that does nothing to change people's desires or deter their behaviors? Like, twenty days ago?

Remember when America made booze illegal, then quickly realized that doing so created an underground economy that funneled mountains of money into organized crime? Like, ninety or so years ago?

Remember when Lao-Tzu said something along the lines of "The more laws are created, the more criminals there will be"? Like, thousands of years ago?

As a species, we seem incapable of learning that particular lesson. Maybe all the legal booze and pot is bad for our memory. Perhaps we should pass a law...

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Psychologically, we humans do have a history of jumping to wrong conclusions based on the way we responded to primitive instinct and intuition; before intelligence showed us that reason based on rational evidence was a more reliable way to make decisions. We're still learning the difference. If we weren't, we wouldn't have developed the scientific method. Evolutionary biology is happening, slowly, and even slower where critical analysis and scientific method have not yet displaced the emotions of our habitual superstitions.

I am tempted to say, "Don't worry - intelligence is coming to a brain near you," but that's only probable if we don't make ourselves extinct.

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Remember when Colorado decided that it was in their best interest to legalize marijuana rather than waste time and money enforcing a law that does nothing to change people's desires or deter their behaviors? Like, twenty days ago?

I'm not a pot smoker at all, don't drink, don't do any drugs except Ambien to sleep, but I'm 100% for legalizing marijuana. If they taxed the living f@@@ out of it, I think it'd raise a ton of money for state governments, plus it would allow thousands of prisoners to be released from jail on pot charges (buying, selling, or possession). It's a waste of time for the police to go after this. Let them go after serious criminals and violent crime, not this crap.

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Regrettably guys, just because you pass a law now to legalize pot, does not mean those already in prison for breaking the previous "on-the-books" laws will be set free. Talk about a bitch, knowing you could light up legally as soon as you step out of your 25 year sentence for buying a baggie.

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Cyrus, Alan Watts books were my introduction to Eastern philosophy and in particular to Zen.

He was much read during 1960s by the flower children and Hippies.

His book, The Wisdom of Insecurity may offer assistance to anyone finding themselves confronted by depression and the threat of authoritarian rules. It is also a marvellous introduction to Eastern philosophy, often bridging the wisdoms of East and West, without recourse to religion.

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I am quite fond of him as well. I admit that I am just breaking into his works, but so far Mr. Watts has proven to be a wonderful source of insight.

I've been Taoist my whole life, though I haven't always realized or accepted it. Sort of like what I once did with my attraction for men.

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Regrettably guys, just because you pass a law now to legalize pot, does not mean those already in prison for breaking the previous "on-the-books" laws will be set free. Talk about a bitch, knowing you could light up legally as soon as you step out of your 25 year sentence for buying a baggie.

That's stupid. I would absolutely, hands-down legalize marijuana, and then say, "everybody convicted of possession or buying pot is now set free." The issue, though, is drug dealers, none of whom were legally licensed (and probably wouldn't be even after pot was made legal), so they'd have to stay in jail. Even in Colorado, you can't sell pot unless you have a license and are collecting state taxes.

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