Jump to content
The Pecman

"Gay Writing Tips" by The Pecman

Recommended Posts

On the other hand: Harlan Ellison has told me on more than one occasion that what he publishes as short stories are essentially first drafts, with very little editing (save for typos). And noted gay author John Rechy has refuted a lot of oft-quoted writing "rules," specifically "write what you know" and "good writing is rewriting."

But I'd say Ellison and Rechy are rare exceptions to the rule, each geniuses in their own way, and both extraordinarily successful and experienced. For everybody else, I think the rules still apply, at least in a general way.

Share this post


Link to post

Agreed. I've written short pieces that I've thought out in my head--pieces of the 1,000 word or so variety. Written them, then edited them a couple of times with just superficial changes.

On the other hand, I am clearly not a "magic user," nor do I exist in the vague 19th century world that I am creating. But they both come from many hours of research & thought, so I suppose that can count as "knowing."

I think it comes down to personal preference, and what the work calls for. A short story could come across as over-worked if you revise, revise, revise, whereas if you are writing a novel, revising doesn't seem inappropriate about a billion times.

Maybe I'm just biased towards the novel form. I can never seem to write anything "short."

Well, except research papers. :-P

Share this post


Link to post

RE: POV changing in a successful novel.

Lorien legacies series by pittacus lore does it. It is a ya book though.

Edit: sorry, I didn't realise how old this was. You may delete this post if it violates the bumping policies.

Share this post


Link to post

It was good to review some of what was said here! Thanks for awakening it. Some very good points above. And they reinforce something I'm trying to convince a writer I'm editing for of.

(Using two prepositions at the end of a sentences obviates the rule of not using one, doesn't it?)

C

Share this post


Link to post

Using two prepositions at the end of a sentences obviates the rule of not using one, doesn't it?

Yes, I would say that's kind of like a double negative: just clumsy writing. There's almost always a simpler and more direct way of saying the same thing.

I don't dispute that ending a sentence with a preposition is grammatically wrong, yet is often used in everyday conversation. Anybody remember that old joke?

"Excuse me, which door should I leave from?"

"Ah, you should never end a sentence with a preposition!"

"Sorry. Which door should I leave from, asshole?"

Share this post


Link to post

I don't dispute that ending a sentence with a preposition is grammatically wrong, yet is often used in everyday conversation. Anybody remember that old joke?

"Excuse me, which door should I leave from?"

"Ah, you should never end a sentence with a preposition!"

"Sorry. Which door should I leave from, asshole?"

That might be an old joke, but it makes me laugh every time I read or hear it. Thanks for posting it!

Colin :icon_geek:

Share this post


Link to post

It is an excellent joke and even transports well to OZ.

Share this post


Link to post

I have to say, there are no doubt even English professors who would not be so bold as to ask, "From which door should I leave?" Too snooty, though it's correct.

Share this post


Link to post

Generation Gap

"Where should I leave from," I asked the old prof

"From where should I leave," he replied

"That's what I asked you," I said with a frown

But at my response, he sighed.

"You're no help at all," I childishly said

"But I am!" he responded; "I'm helping you out"

"Out's what I want! So where's the door at?"

He shook his head sadly: "Now please son, don't pout.

But you're at it again," and then with a grin

Said, "Where's the door at, asshole; does that ring a bell?"

I wrinkled my brow and shook my head

And said, "I'm not the asshole here, and you, go to hell."

Share this post


Link to post

I read Stephen King's book on writing and to be truthful I think he was fishing for plot ideas from his readers because he suggested that you send them along to him...

I liked David Mamet's book, “Writing in Restaurants” a bit better.

The Pecman's piece is excellent. I am glad he calls it tips instead of rules. Who knows you might invent a new style.

My #1 rule is to bend over backwards to avoid cliches.. Oops, bend over backwards is a cliche.

My point is that sometimes we don't even see them. Avoid them like a plague, oops, there's another one.. Think of a new way of saying something. Avoid the words that we over use and look for more accurate words to suit the situation.

Someone who can type more that “lol” might provide a good chat log for a dialog. Print it out and reconstruct it.

Don't just introduce your characters, design them. Give them unique characteristics but don't make them perfect. Give them some endearing flaws so that they become human. Only give enough to generally describe them but let your reader fill in the inessential to suite their own taste.

Do this on another sheet just to acquaint yourself with the character ( a minibiography) Fall in love with your character and then, drop them in to your story. Add descriptive pieces here and there or as needed and after all that, get them into trouble..

I will carry on my philosophy concerning writing about sex in a subsequent piece.

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...