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The Nordia Incident by James Savik


Chris James

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This is a short story? What James has given us is a fine piece of writing worthy to be the opening of a 400 page book, or barring that, a trilogy or longer. In the tradition of Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert, and even modern day Jack Campbell, James has written a science fiction story that appeals on so many levels, even to a non sci-fi reader like me.

As a concept the plot is timeless, mankind can be so inhumane if no one is looking. The conclusion James draws is what you might expect, and yet there is so much more to be told. What he has set up in this short story is what leaves us begging for more. Good job, James.

Here is where you will find it: http://www.awesomedude.com/jamessavik/the-nordia-incident/the-nordia-incident.htm

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This is a short story? What James has given us is a fine piece of writing worthy to be the opening of a 400 page book, or barring that, a trilogy or longer. In the tradition of Isaac Asimov, Frank Herbert, and even modern day Jack Campbell, James has written a science fiction story that appeals on so many levels, even to a non sci-fi reader like me.

As a concept the plot is timeless, mankind can be so inhumane if no one is looking. The conclusion James draws is what you might expect, and yet there is so much more to be told. What he has set up in this short story is what leaves us begging for more. Good job, James.

Here is where you will find it: http://www.awesomedude.com/jamessavik/the-nordia-incident/the-nordia-incident.htm

I wrote to him and said pretty much the same thing. As it turns out it is the premise for his operation Hammerhead and I think he said there will be other spin offs as well.

It is indeed an awesome peace.

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Kudos to James.

I'm a scifi/fantasy junky, as my friend Chris James can attest.

This piece is a fine piece of work, and James is to be given a huge pat on the back for how he approached this opening salvo into what I hope will become available, either here or in print (ink or electronic). I agree with Chris BTW that this is certainly reminiscent of Jack Campbell's writing.

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I agree with Chris BTW that this is certainly reminiscent of Jack Campbell's writing.

I am humbled by the comparison. "Jack Cambell" (John G. Hemry) and I are acquainted.

He used my name as one of of his characters in Beyond the Frontier: Steadfast.

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A remarkably well written piece of science fiction - using that term in the strictest sense. I agree with those above, this would make a fine beginning to a novel or series. My congratulations to James on a fine piece of writing.

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After the slave trade was abolished in the Commonwealth and the United States, one of the chief occupations of the Royal and US Navy was the suppression of that vile institution.

The Royal Navy's West Africa Squadron and the US Navy's African Slave Patrol began its work in 1808 and 1819 respectively.

It was of particular importance for several reasons. Those two nations took upon themselves police powers in international waters. Second, they enforced international law on the high seas. Of course the suppression of piracy had been a priority for the great naval powers for centuries, this was the beginning of a partnership between the English speaking nations that created a tradition of cooperation and fostered a much safer maritime operating environment.

This cooperation effectively stopped the organized slave trade. The Atlantic slave trade continued as smuggling until Brazil outlawed slavery in 1888. Outlaw slave operations out of East Africa continued until just before the start of WWi.

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I was just discussing this story with Addym last evening. It has always been a fascination to me just where an author gets the inspiration for the plot, and here we have James giving us a hint with his history lesson. The issue of slavery is as old as humanity. I think every society has seen it in one form or another, especially when they view one race as superior to another.

The unique way James introduces the subject in his story gives us to understand that there will always be those who see the economic gain in captive labor, and in this case making alterations to fit the need. This part of the story begs for more illumination although I have the feeling James has said his piece and left the building with Elvis.

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This part of the story begs for more illumination although I have the feeling James has said his piece and left the building with Elvis.

Ah, how true, Chris. But we can be like those dedicated Elvis fans who have, for decades, believed that the song-meister had not truly left that building forever, but would return to continue bedazzling us with his remarkable music. So, though we may not be screaming girls and women, fainting at the very sight of him, I think we can all admit that there will be a small part of each of us that hopes James will, unlike Elvis, return to the scene of this remarkable triumph and continue to elicite sighs from his fans as his story continues to unfold.

Here's to wishes.

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For those of you that are interested the Nordia Incident is indeed the start of a longer story.

In fact, I'm a hundred pages in already.

This is the introduction to the next book.


When the Alliance Civil War broke out 2549, the giant TranStellar corporations located in the Corporate Sector seceded from the Alliance and formed the Consolidated Federation (commonly called the ConFed). The ConFed consisted of five huge TransStellar corporations: Nakajima, MilTech, Venture, предприятие (Enterprise) and Gradient plus hundreds of smaller subsidiaries located in the sector. Those five corporations alone accounted for almost thirty percent of the Alliance GNP. In the beginning they had a small edge in technology but that edge was fleeting.

The Corporate War took four long years of hard, bitter fighting. When it started neither side was ready for hostilities. Caught by surprise, both militaries struggled to adjust. The fighting was confused and sporadic. The two fleets fought a series of fierce, sharp inconclusive engagements between cruisers and destroyers.

When the Alliance was able to bring their new battle cruisers and carriers into the fight, the ConFed fleet was thrown back and finally destroyed at the Battle of Pelenor.

Historically the Corporate War was not much to brag about militarily on either side. At first it was a comedy of errors. Then it became a drama of attrition. Finally the weight of metal decided the matter.

The Corporate War wasn’t that interesting compared to what happened afterwards. The Alliance liberated millions of genetically engineered slaves. That’s when things got interesting.

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