Jump to content
Fun Tails

The Gay Agenda: WHAT'S NEXT?

Recommended Posts

With the recent gay marriage developments in NY and California, the dominoes have started tumbling and there's no going back. Gay Marriage *will* be the norm in the not too distant future.

Gays are winning an important battle.

What more is left to be done in other areas? Should there even be talk of a collective agenda for gays?

As for what remains to be done, there are a few issues that come to mind.,

-------------------------------

Teen suicide: Gays are an overly large proportion of these. However, as gay marriage becomes normalised and homophobia ebbs, I see this problem taking care of itself, because the root of the problem will go away.

Gay bashing: Again, the root of this is homophobia and that battle is being won.

HIV and AIDS: How big a problem is this? I've been on gay hookup/ dating sites and there are lots of guys who state that they don't always use safer sex. I understand that there are circumstances where you can relax the rules, like if you're in a stable committed relationship, but I'm worried that young gays don't take this problem seriously enough.

Sexual Assault and Domestic abuse: I've heard anti-gay activists bring up statistics to show that gays are more likely to be involved in abusive relationships. I know that some gays get raped/ date-raped and shrug it off as part of the scene.

The anti-gay activists are dumb to think that a higher domesticv abuse rate mean that there's something inherently wrong with being gay, but I do think that if the numbers they tout are true, then the gay community *does* have a problem. Where does it stem from and what can be done about it by gays?

----------------------------------------------

Like I said at the top, the larger question remains as to whether the gay community should be acting as a unified body on any of this. I certainly think that those who are engaged in 'activism' should take a look at these and other issues, even if it's not the whole community.

Any other issues/ concerns that I missed?

Link to comment
With the recent gay marriage developments in NY and California, the dominoes have started tumbling and there's no going back. Gay Marriage *will* be the norm in the not too distant future.

Gays are winning an important battle.

What more is left to be done in other areas? Should there even be talk of a collective agenda for gays?

As for what remains to be done, there are a few issues that come to mind.,

-------------------------------

Teen suicide: Gays are an overly large proportion of these. However, as gay marriage becomes normalised and homophobia ebbs, I see this problem taking care of itself, because the root of the problem will go away.

Gay bashing: Again, the root of this is homophobia and that battle is being won.

HIV and AIDS: How big a problem is this? I've been on gay hookup/ dating sites and there are lots of guys who state that they don't always use safer sex. I understand that there are circumstances where you can relax the rules, like if you're in a stable committed relationship, but I'm worried that young gays don't take this problem seriously enough.

Sexual Assault and Domestic abuse: I've heard anti-gay activists bring up statistics to show that gays are more likely to be involved in abusive relationships. I know that some gays get raped/ date-raped and shrug it off as part of the scene.

The anti-gay activists are dumb to think that a higher domesticv abuse rate mean that there's something inherently wrong with being gay, but I do think that if the numbers they tout are true, then the gay community *does* have a problem. Where does it stem from and what can be done about it by gays?

----------------------------------------------

Like I said at the top, the larger question remains as to whether the gay community should be acting as a unified body on any of this. I certainly think that those who are engaged in 'activism' should take a look at these and other issues, even if it's not the whole community.

Any other issues/ concerns that I missed?

I think that the gay community should make it their business to be on the forefront of solving major issues that affect society as a whole, like the energy crisis and job creation. We have a lot of hurdles to jump when it comes to gay rights, but I truly believe that we can play a pivitol role in bringing the US to energy independence within the next ten years by laying out plans for building nuclear energy sites and refineries. We can also encourage job creation in the private sector by proposing our own plan to give tax incentives to small and large businesses that are willing to train Americans to do jobs they might not otherwise be qualified for.

We should also be advocating that America drills for her own oil right here at home. We can offer designs for a light rail system that connects commuters in New York to Commuters in South Carolina, and it can be powered using nuclear energy. We can talk about the need for deforestization of more wilderness to make room for larger factories, and we can address the imigration debate with common sense solutions, not a far left or far right reaction that so far hasn't been popular among most Americans.

In other words, we can become a major part of the solution to this nation's largest dilemas, and at the same time, we can champion our own causes. Namely, more gays need to be adoption children, and not just kids that are runaways from homophobic families. If there's room in your household, agree to foster and adopt older children who have no hope otherwise of ever being adopted.

Of course, these problems don't just stop with us. The rest of the US has to take an active role in providing solutions, too. But who says we shouldn't set the precedent?

Link to comment

WTF!? California has or is about to get gay marriage. Pardon me if I ask SO WHAT!?

Gays in most of the rest of the country have absolutely no legal recognition as a minoritiy nor do we have any protection from discrimination.

The question isn't now what. The real question is when, if ever, will gays who do not live in BIG GAY MECCAS or Blue State Strongholds have our human rights acknowleged and protected?

We are generations away from being able to sit on our laurels.

I think that the gay community should make it their business to be on the forefront of solving major issues that affect society as a whole, like the energy crisis and job creation...

I'll get right on that as soon as the breeders offer me equal protection and oppertunities under the law. Otherwise they are on their own.

Link to comment
WTF!? California has or is about to get gay marriage. Pardon me if I ask SO WHAT!? Gays in most of the rest of the country have absolutely no legal recognition as a minoritiy nor do we have any protection from discrimination.

You need to read the news more often. The Governor of NY just said that they would recognize any gay marriage from California or Massachusetts.

We're taking small steps here, but I see them as important and necessary. Bit by bit, we're making some headway, and I'm very happy and hopeful about it.

BTW, the domestic partner laws in California do provide for equal benefits in most areas. My partner and I have already used them to get him health insurance, and that's helped us in the past.

Link to comment
I'll get right on that as soon as the breeders offer me equal protection and oppertunities under the law. Otherwise they are on their own.

If you're going to stand around and wait for them to offer it to you, I'm afraid you'll be waiting for a long time. I understand that you live in a backwards state, but you have to remember that at one time in Mississippi, Alabama, Virginia and throughout the south blacks were considered less than zero. Here in VA, up until 1970, it was illegal for a black man to marry a white woman. The commonwealth carried out illegal sterilizations of black men and women up until the early 1980's, and they're still settling with families they wronged.

So just because it hasn't happened yet doesn't mean it isn't coming. And sometimes the best thing to do when you want something is to walk up to the person who has what you want and take it for yourself. Also, just for the record, refering to people as breeders isn't very helpful, and it only encourages name calling on both sides (words like faggot and fairy, for instance).

The point of my original post was that yes, we have a lot of headway to make in the social issues that affect us directly, but if we make more of a contribution to the issues that affect everyone, it gives our side as a whole more legitimacy. Personally, I think we focus too much on what's good for us only, and not enough on what everyone needs. I mean, don't you pay the same price for gas as straight people? Or is there some gay gas club that offers discounts that I haven't discovered? Wouldn't job creation make it less likely that another gay man turns to prostitution? Don't tax cuts give gay and lesbians the same advantages that they give straight folks?

In other words, things that affect the nation affect us too. So again, I think all of those issues (and more) should be a major part of the gay agenda.

Link to comment

I think there is an underlying necessity to consider the contributions that the homosexual has made to the society of Mankind since prehistoric times.

These many and varied contributions need not be itemised though such a list might be interesting to read. What is more important is to realise that human beings have a biological and emotional need and right to express their feelings towards each other in mind and body.

That the physical expression of such feelings between people has been suppressed and oppressed for such an extraordinarily long period of time, means that acceptance is slow, but it is happening.

Those communities which still resist this human right must eventually adopt acceptance. This is a number one priority for any gay agenda. It should also be part of any agenda of human rights. People should not be tortured and killed for whom they love.

In considering the value of the homosexual's persistent cultural contributions to human existence on this planet, we must not overlook that such contributions are inherent in the homosexual desire to give of their passion to enrich life. This is the offspring of our love.

It is the procreation of love that does not limit itself to gender.

For centuries gay people have given their time, talents, blood, sweat and tears to the collective societies of the human race, often at great personal peril.

The gay agenda then, should be to ensure that we as gay people do not allow humanity to lose the capacity we have shown, to give and love, but also that we are able to receive recognition and acceptance that homosexuality is a necessary and desirable part of the human experience.

The gay experience should be universal in its availability. That I believe, is the agenda with which we must be concerned, and for which, we must demand acceptance. Anything less is subservient.

Love and its expression, regardless of gender, is a human right that I feel is worth the effort to protect for the whole human race. That the majority do not yet fully understand this, makes it part of the gay agenda we must achieve.

:wink:

Link to comment
I mean, don't you pay the same price for gas as straight people? Or is there some gay gas club that offers discounts that I haven't discovered?

Go to the Citgo station between 3 pm and midnight. Ask for Max. Use the codephrase, "Senor, that banana looks creamy." If he likes the way you blow him, your gas is 10% off.*

*I know 10% doesn't sound like much, but in these times, you take what you can get.

Link to comment

Yes- I'm pleased to see progress in any area but seriously- we're talking about three states: two on the East Coast and California + one state that says they will recognize gay marriages from other states but has no plans to allow gay marriage at home.

Here is a dose of reality for you: 47 states DO NOT have gay marriage nor are they likely too in the forseeable future. In fact most states do not have gay marriage or discrimination protections under the law for GLBT people.

Alabama

Arkansas

Alaska

Arizona

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

District of Columbia

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Maine

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

Nevada

New Jersey

New Mexico

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Vermont

Virginia

Washington

West Virginia

Wisconsin

Wyoming

Let's put a few more wins in the bag before we ask What Next. From where I'm sitting, there is still a hell of a lot to do.

Link to comment

This discussion intrigues me and it has me "chomping at the bit", but I am a little hesitant to involve myself too much here -- not because I feel that I do not have knowledge regarding the issues being discussed but rather because my own background is perhaps very different from most that I have otherwise received a picture of on the forums through postings. But it is through such impassioned postings that I can begin to understand who my colleagues are (and have been and want to become). For that I am truly grateful.

I am an American expatriate, have lived in Europe for 50% of my life, know all too much about being hiv-positive, being gay, being bisexual, being abused by family, lovers and strangers (in all ways), have been a national and international gay and hiv-activist for fifteen years (and represented Norway internationally, including at the United Nations ... and have also supported American gays in their struggles nationally and internationally), I cannot visit my homeland because of restrictions against hiv-positive tourists, I have been formally "married" in a legal gay partnership ... and also divorced from the same, jada jada jada. All of the issues that Funtails raises are extremely important, and I personally believe that gay marriage in itself will not solve everything. Focus must be directed at all levels. The biggest loss (in my opinion) is the loss of "gay culture", which I have commented on previously on these forums. Being "gay" will always be an issue in society, so let us not kid ourselves into thinking that once we act "straight" enough in others' eyes that we will be truly accepted. There is a big difference between being accepted and being tolerated as long as we adhere and do not provoke. What is "gay culture"? Well, that is an elusive issue that is everchanging ... culture is always evolving per definition. But these forums are a part of "gay culture" ... so let us think a bit about how we discuss, how much we permit others to have their opinions and personal identity and areas of focus. And I think that heated discussion is good -- very good. It is democracy in action. Praise the forums, and praise AD for this opportunity. But let us not get so lost in the heat of our momentary convictions that we forget to treat each other with humanity and respect. Writers have a tremendous source of power within them: the written word. Many of these issues need several authors' voices. If authors and artists do not speak out, then our fate is truly in the hands of a very few activists, politicians and martyrs.

Namaste.

A.

Link to comment

Hey James -

I noticed that you included WA on your list of states that have no protections around gay relationships. This is actually no longer the case. WA now recognizes Domestic Partnerships, and extends many - though not all - of the same rights and responsibilities to people in those relationships that people in heterosexual marriages enjoy. My housemates, Robert and Anthony, are preparing to register as domestic partners, and it's a very good thing.

I think Another has a good point: in the rush to assimilate into the mainstream culture, much of the qualities that make us unique as a subculture are being lost. Much of our history is undocumented, and therefore is also being lost as our elder brothers and sisters die in obscurity. I think one of the projects that needs to be undertaken is to create an archive of the personal histories of the gay elderly, so that those stories aren't lost, because that is where the history of our subculture lies.

My hackles rose when someone mentioned deforestization to build larger factories to manufacture more products, and building more nuclear power plants...apparently whoever that was doesn't live anywhere close to the Hanford Nuclear Reserve, where much of the waste product from the existing nuclear powerplants is/has been shipped for 'storage'...oddly enough, there is a very high concentration of cases of cancer among humans downwind of that area, and the wetlands near that area is home to a large population of three-eyed frogs...I kid you not. Let's figure out what to do with the waste from our existing plants before we start building more, shall we?

cheers!

aj

Link to comment
Hey James -

I noticed that you included WA on your list of states that have no protections around gay relationships. This is actually no longer the case. WA now recognizes Domestic Partnerships, and extends many - though not all - of the same rights and responsibilities to people in those relationships that people in heterosexual marriages enjoy. My housemates, Robert and Anthony, are preparing to register as domestic partners, and it's a very good thing.

I think Another has a good point: in the rush to assimilate into the mainstream culture, much of the qualities that make us unique as a subculture are being lost. Much of our history is undocumented, and therefore is also being lost as our elder brothers and sisters die in obscurity. I think one of the projects that needs to be undertaken is to create an archive of the personal histories of the gay elderly, so that those stories aren't lost, because that is where the history of our subculture lies.

My hackles rose when someone mentioned deforestization to build larger factories to manufacture more products, and building more nuclear power plants...apparently whoever that was doesn't live anywhere close to the Hanford Nuclear Reserve, where much of the waste product from the existing nuclear powerplants is/has been shipped for 'storage'...oddly enough, there is a very high concentration of cases of cancer among humans downwind of that area, and the wetlands near that area is home to a large population of three-eyed frogs...I kid you not. Let's figure out what to do with the waste from our existing plants before we start building more, shall we?

cheers!

aj

Just send it to Nevada. They'll never notice the difference, and we still get the nuclear power we need. Your state should give it a try :wink:

Link to comment

Thanks AJ ! BTW there is a website that affords persons the possibility to send electronic e-cards for free. Every card you send helps to raise awareness for many important issues. In addition, subscribers are encouraged to participate in e-petitions for various environmental, social and human rights issues. Check it out: http://www.care2.com/

It is one small way individuals can help -- wherever you are in the world.

Link to comment
The biggest loss (in my opinion) is the loss of "gay culture", which I have commented on previously on these forums. Being "gay" will always be an issue in society, so let us not kid ourselves into thinking that once we act "straight" enough in others' eyes that we will be truly accepted. There is a big difference between being accepted and being tolerated as long as we adhere and do not provoke.

I think you bring up a different problem. I'm just saying that gay people (and gay rights) are making small inroads all over the world. We're still a lot better off now than we were, say, five years ago. It's going to happen, but it won't happen overnight.

What is "gay culture"? Well, that is an elusive issue that is everchanging ... culture is always evolving per definition.

Well, if you're saying, "if gay people are accepted 100% by society, then we'll lose the uniqueness that makes us different than anybody else." I don't see that happening. Despite the fact that some of the greatest artists, actors, and musicians who ever lived were gay, I don't agree that their being gay necessarily made them any better (or more creative) thn a straight artist.

The same goes for gay culture. To me, there's just *human* culture. There's good art and bad art, and I won't necessarily like or dislike it because I believe it fits what people think of as gay culture. I believe if we concentrate on being honorable, rational people first and gay people second, we'll get a lot further in the world.

As I often say, being gay is only a part of who I am. It might be at the core of my conciousness, but it doesn't affect how I drive, what I eat, or how I get along in the world.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...


×
×
  • Create New...