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Iraq


Camy

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Iraq

by Camy

written on the 7th October 2007 after reading 'Rainbow Warrior' by Jason R.

Was it right for our politicians to cozen us so?

Was it right to invade without a unanimous 'go'?

Was it right to attack with missiles and bombs,

while reporters reported with western aplomb?

"They could destroy us all!" We were told.

We must help our friends - be in the fold.

We’ll topple saddam he's a bad, bad man …

and control their oil - that's a fucking good plan!

But what of those who live peaceful lives?

Who struggle to love, laugh and survive.

Who have no idea of the hell we'll cause,

as we sunder their country, and hope for applause.

Is it wrong they fight back with whatever's to hand?

Is it wrong they believe in jihad for their land?

Is it wrong they fight 'foul', and blow themselves up?

Is it wrong they ask Allah to give them some luck?

Zing zing zing the bullets go.

Crump kaboom a cartoon show.

But the blood’s too real, the pain’s obscene.

An abhorred invasion on the tv screen.

was it wrong? How can it possibly be right?

---

The whole concept of war terrifies me, though I used to play at war as a kid, much like all kids.

I have nothing but admiration for those who join up to fight for their countries believing they are fighting a just cause. It's just that I don't believe Iraq is a just war. The solders of all countries who are dying out there, are dying for politicians, oil, and the conglomerates who will make a fortune 're-building' - if it ever comes to that, which is doubtful.

Sorry for the naive waffle.

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I totally agree with you, Camy. War is more than obscene, and innocent kids die for promises and ideals that are simply words. When young kids die, it's because old men fail. And the young kids have entire lives ahead of them, the old men more past glories than anything else. The old men are failing, and will be forgotten. The young kids are dying. They, not the old men, are our future.

Few things are so awful, and so, so, so unnecessary.

C

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Wow Camy,

This is one time I'll gladly take credit for inspiring you. This piece is brilliant, tied together by such simple questions. My god, but what powerful questions they are. I only wish we, as American's, would've asked some of those questions before our last election. A remarkable piece. Hands down, brilliant.

Jason R.

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I am so impressed.

This inspiration amongst poets (Jason and Camy), is exactly what creativity is all about.

We exchange ideas, thoughts and give each other insights to our visions.

We extend our humanity when we do this.

Well done both of you.

Camy I can almost hear Replying to Iraq as a song.

Protest songs against war were some of the best things to come out of the Vietnam conflict in the 60s, but your poem is definitely deeper and more passionate. I would love to hear it read with poignant sounds of war and peace in the background.

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Both pieces, Jason R's and Camy's are great, sad, and thought provoking. Kudos to both.

Oh, and Des, I don't supposed you could give an example, in regard to this "poignant sounds of war and peace". I can sort of imagine the sounds of war, but 'poignant sounds of peace' simply eludes me.

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Both pieces, Jason R's and Camy's are great, sad, and thought provoking. Kudos to both.

Oh, and Des, I don't supposed you could give an example, in regard to this "poignant sounds of war and peace". I can sort of imagine the sounds of war, but 'poignant sounds of peace' simply eludes me.

Difficult to describe Trab. Sort of like the movie "The Killing Fields" where Puccini's music with it's soulful melody is juxtapositioned with the images of the mass grave of skeletons. This is easier to do with visual image accompanied by sound than in sound alone. However the sound alone can be of much wider scope.

For Camy's poem I think we would need something more subtle. The sound of a lone bird call might do it.

A dog barking happily, children laughing at play. A collage of sounds may be possible. These soundscapes as they are called these days, can be very powerful and add meaning to a work if used appropriately.

The idea being to convey the opposites in background sound to the reality of the horrors contained in Camy's justified questions and observations. At the same time they enhance the impact and truth contained in the words.

Of course this has to be done very carefully and sensitively or we end up making a mockery of the whole thing. In truth I think a simple reading of the poem would be sufficiently poignant in itself, but the dramatist in me wants more...

Setting the poem to music as a song would be marvellous.

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Difficult to describe Trab. Sort of like the movie "The Killing Fields" where Puccini's music with it's soulful melody is juxtapositioned with the images of the mass grave of skeletons. This is easier to do with visual image accompanied by sound than in sound alone. However the sound alone can be of much wider scope.

For Camy's poem I think we would need something more subtle. The sound of a lone bird call might do it.

A dog barking happily, children laughing at play. A collage of sounds may be possible. These soundscapes as they are called these days, can be very powerful and add meaning to a work if used appropriately.

The idea being to convey the opposites in background sound to the reality of the horrors contained in Camy's justified questions and observations. At the same time they enhance the impact and truth contained in the words.

Of course this has to be done very carefully and sensitively or we end up making a mockery of the whole thing. In truth I think a simple reading of the poem would be sufficiently poignant in itself, but the dramatist in me wants more...

Setting the poem to music as a song would be marvellous.

I second that motion.

Hmmmm

I'll make a deal with you Camy.

If you put this piece to music and let us all hear it.

*Takes a deep breath*

I"ll do a reading of The Finale.

There, I said. And everyone is a witness. The ball's in your court now Emu.

Jason R.

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I second that motion.

Hmmmm

I'll make a deal with you Camy.

If you put this piece to music and let us all hear it.

*Takes a deep breath*

I"ll do a reading of The Finale.

There, I said. And everyone is a witness. The ball's in your court now Emu.

Jason R.

Jason!

Done deal! Though there will be a bit of a delay, as I have to kick my muse up the arse - and you know how recalcitrant he is ....

Camy

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OMG, these are terrific developments, and my abyssmal ignorance may have been a teeny tiny factor.

Des, thank-you for your explanation. I understand now. A 'medley' of happy peace representing sounds, like maybe a duck quacking, a minister saying something as short as, "kiss the bride", the squalling of a just born infant, the purring of a cat, and even the sound of an egg cracking and hitting the hot frying pan, would induce this sort of peaceful contented feeling. It's a revelation to me. ((( Des ))) :bunny:

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I've been pondering whether I should turn 'Iraq' into a song, or a sound-scape piece. And though I still haven't decided, I've been doing some 'research' for sound effects, noises, etc.

To cut a long story short, I came upon this piece in the 'Internet Archive'.

Join us tonight for Night Ride, Volume 57: Resistance. In the wake of the single largest day of protest in world history, when 30 million world citizens marched on every continent to protest U.S. aggression and the days of rage that followed the initial bombing in Iraq, people took to the streets to show their resistance to empire.

This Night Ride aired originally in 2003 (or thereabouts) on KUSP FM in Santa Cruz (www.kusp.org). Hosted by Wes Modes and Johnny Hirst.

Night Ride is all about the narrative voice. A dreamy collage of story and music. A journey with many voices on a long late night drive. Each week, Night Ride explores a different theme. Night Ride airs weekly on Free Radio Santa Cruz Sunday 6pm to 8pm

I beg you to listen to at least the first hour of it. It's so poignant, and interesting too. You can stream it direct from the page, or download it, if you want.

http://www.archive.org/details/NightRide-V57-Resistance

Camy

- If I ever got the chance to work on a program like this, I'd be a happy chap.

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I've been pondering whether I should turn 'Iraq' into a song, or a sound-scape piece. And though I still haven't decided, I've been doing some 'research' for sound effects, noises, etc.

To cut a long story short, I came upon this piece in the 'Internet Archive'.

I beg you to listen to at least the first hour of it. It's so poignant, and interesting too. You can stream it direct from the page, or download it, if you want.

http://www.archive.org/details/NightRide-V57-Resistance

Camy

- If I ever got the chance to work on a program like this, I'd be a happy chap.

I know I said i could imagine 'Iraq" with a soundscape in my mind but I guess I would vote for the song.

But hey, it really is what you feel is in the best interests of your vision. why not work on both? :hehe:

PS I will have a listen to the stream you reference above, sounds fascinating.

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