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Anti-gay republican in gay sex scandal... AGAIN!?

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Anti-Gay Republican Cruised Craigslist for Male Prostitute

Source Link: Gawker.com

Indiana State Rep. Phillip "Phil" Hinkle, a Republican who recently voted for a constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, had quite a Saturday evening this past weekend in the company of an 18-year-old young man named "Kameryn," to whom Hinkle allegedly showed his penis and then "grabbed in the rear." Isn't life wonderful?

According to the stories of 18-year-old Kameryn Gibson, his sister Megan Gibson, a treasure trove of extremely accurate-seeming emails and phone calls, and Hinkle's own non-denials, here's how it went down.

Kameryn Gibson went on the m4m section of Craigslist and posted an ad saying, "I need a sugga daddy." Hinkle responded with an offer to fill this role and pay Gibson $80 or so dollars, and, "for a really good time, you could get another 50, 60 bucks. That sound good?" He picked Gibson up at his house, took him to a hotel room, and showed him his state lawmaker ID. Gibson got cold feet and went to the bathroom to call his sister, Megan, and ask her to pick him up. This made Hinkle sad!

When Gibson came out, he said Hinkle told him he couldn't leave. Gibson called his sister again. This time, Megan told him to put her on speakerphone.

"I started cussing him," Megan told The Star. She also threatened to call the police and the local media.

"He said, 'I'll give you whatever,'" Megan said.

But when they hung up, Kameryn Gibson said Hinkle grabbed him by the right arm, just below the shoulder. Gibson said it was then that Hinkle grabbed him in the rear, dropped his towel and sat down on the bed — naked.

When Megan Gibson arrived to pick up her brother, she again threatened to call police and the local media.

Kameryn and Megan Gibson said Hinkle then offered his iPad, a BlackBerry and $100 in cash.

Kameryn Gibson walked past his sister and out of the room as she continued to yell at Hinkle.

Megan Gibson then started fielding calls on Hinkle's BlackBerry from various members of his family. She told them all that he was gay. And then she told the Indianapolis Star.

Hinkle does not have much of a response for the moment:

When contacted by The Star about the emails, Hinkle, a Republican who represents portions of Pike and Wayne townships, did not contest the emails but said, "I am aware of a shakedown taking place."

Asked what he meant by shakedown, Hinkle would not elaborate. He directed further questions to his attorney.

If we had to go out on a limb, we'd guess that this won't help Hinkle's political career. Although this is the ten billionth time we've seen a story like this by now, so maybe people have just come to expect it.

Also: "Kameryn." Seriously?

See original article in the Indy Star

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Guest Dabeagle
Anti-Gay Republican Cruised Craigslist for Male Prostitute

Also: "Kameryn." Seriously?

You know, the names part is fascinating. I read Freakonomics a while ago and one of the things they examined was how a name impacts someone's life. One guy took this psychology to the extreme and name done child Winner and another Loser. Winner is an ex-con (or maybe current again, who knows?) and Loser went on to be a police detective. Lower income families will frequently give children unusual names to help them stand out; and of course the occasional celebrity. By now I think most people have heard of the argument about what conclusions you draw if two resumes are handed to you and one is from Sally Smith and another from Shaniqueh Johnson; so the logic of such names may be flawed due simply to preconceptions based on a name.

When it comes to story writing, you want a name that stands out but isn't too cutesy as to destroy credibility. Cameron isn't too far gone to me, it's still 'normal' enough. Kameryn says different things to me that Cameron does; perhaps because of the Freakonomics I instantly put Kameryn in a lower economic household that is more likely to have a single parent or perhaps only a legal guardian and a poor educational system supporting him. Preconception, I know, I know. But I do think it more likely that some kid with a silver spoon in his mouth and a Mercedes in the drive from his sweet 16 would not have such a cutesy, unique name.

Still, depending on how far off reality the story is, Kameryn could fit better than Cameron. For instance in one story set in space I used Aethan instead of Ethan, since things seems generally funkier in space. I always laugh when they introduce someone on Star Trek lets say and he's named Bob.

That's just me, what do you think?

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I think it's an interesting subject, something we've mentioned in passing here before. I base my story characters' names on what those names say to me; it's very likely they don't say the same things to most other people, but they help define these guys, to me.

I get the feeling in black culture there's an effort being made to add a uniqueness to the names children are given. Is this an effort to make sure the child is known to be black? I can see both good and bad in this. It will probably give him a stronger identity in the black community growing up, and kids need a sense of themselves as part of a community. However, if the kid grows up with aspirations of joining a prestigious law firm, say, I think some of those names would hold him back. I wouldn't be surprised if someone in that position might actually change his name to further his career. If one is operating at a high level in a mostly white society, I'd guess chances for success rise if one can be more easily assimilated, and a name is important in that respect.

Oh, and I agree entirely with Dave. For an alien, Aethan is a much preferable name to Ethan. I don't think Clyde would be good, either.

C

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I get the feeling in black culture there's an effort being made to add a uniqueness to the names children are given. Is this an effort to make sure the child is known to be black? C

I wonder how that would apply if the following story were true, and for all I know it may be:

A couple from Nigeria ended up in Baltimore at John's Hopkins Hospital where their two children were born. The first, a boy, they called Male and the girl born the following year was called Female (accent on the e). This because the chart hanging on the mother's bed identified the children as male and female so they thought the doctor had named them.

Cultural differences perhaps? We have to respect that as we are a nation of immigrants.

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One of the most intriguing things about this thread is how people have reacted to it.

It's like there have been so many anti-gay social conservatives caught with their pants down, trying to get their pants down or flying off with rent boi baggage handlers that it's become almost a bore. :icon_geek:

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I wonder how that would apply if the following story were true, and for all I

know it may be:

A couple from Nigeria ended up in Baltimore at John's

Hopkins Hospital where their two children were born. The first, a boy, they

called Male and the girl born the following year was called Female (accent on

the e). This because the chart hanging on the mother's bed identified the

children as male and female so they thought the doctor had named them.

Cultural differences perhaps? We have to respect that as we are a nation

of immigrants.

A retired nurse neighbor of mine tells of the welfare mother who named her daughter Placenta... as she heard the word used a lot at the hospital and liked the way it sounded. Cultural difference?

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Having survived our own recent hippy cultural history where names like 'Balbo Shrooms' and 'Chasidy Rainbow' and even 'Rainy Daylee' were considered commonplace in some registry offices, I'd lean toward the Czech custom. The Czechs maintain an elaborate "naming calendar" with first names for both boys and for girls assigned to every day of the year.During the Communist era parents needed a special permission form to give a child a name that did not have a name day listed on the Czech calendar. Since 1989 parents have had the right to give their child any name they wish, provided it is used somewhere in the world ad is not insulting nor demeaning. However, the common practice is that most birth-registry offices look for the name in the book "What is your child going to be called?", which is a semi-official list of "allowed" names. If the name is not found there, offices are extremely unwilling to register the child's name.

James

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One of the most intriguing things about this thread is how people have reacted to it.

It's like there have been so many anti-gay social conservatives caught with their pants down, trying to get their pants down or flying off with rent boi baggage handlers that it's become almost a bore. :rolleyes:

I think these days I'd be more surprised to come across an anti-gay social conservative who, at his retirement party, is found to be completely upstanding, always behaved in line with his stated beliefs, and is utterly innocent of money laundering, illegal procurement of funds, picking up rent-bois from craigslist, use of hard drugs, clandestine financial support of violence and torture, and behaving as if they were utterly above the law.

Sadly, I don't mean any of those. I mean all of them. What was that article I read a few days ago? Something about powerful and rich people actually being confirmed to be less empathetic that most people? Ah, here it is.

Food for thought. Of course, correlation does not imply causation, in either direction, so assuming power causes lack of empathy, or that lack of empathy makes it more likely to come into wealth and power, it tenuous at best. But still, there it is.

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Guest Dabeagle
I wonder how that would apply if the following story were true, and for all I know it may be:

A couple from Nigeria ended up in Baltimore at John's Hopkins Hospital where their two children were born. The first, a boy, they called Male and the girl born the following year was called Female (accent on the e). This because the chart hanging on the mother's bed identified the children as male and female so they thought the doctor had named them.

Cultural differences perhaps? We have to respect that as we are a nation of immigrants.

I've been thinking about this off an on for a while, wasn't sure how to take it since so much depends upon the perspective of whomever is reading the statement. I readily admit to being ignorant of many different cultures, but frankly I'm not all that troubled by it. I don't think anyone could paint an accurate picture, for instance, of the American Culture. Sometimes just crossing to another side of town changes that completely. Also something being part of a 'culture' doesn't automatically make it good or worthy of respect; I think that is far more individual. For instance, I have zero respect for the cultural rules that say eating a dog is okay or good for your sex life. Seeing them stacked on atop the other with their all too intelligent eyes peering from the wire cages outside restaurants simply infuriates me. But then, I'm weird, as I don't particularly like seeing even lobsters in a tank for people's choosing, especially since I found out they have been recorded screaming in the water as thy are cooked alive. Simply being a part of a culture isn't a good reason, to me.

Then there is the humor angle. Humor is so dicey, since it often revolves around someone's misfortune; in this instance of not understanding the language in the country they apparently live in.

While we were founded as immigrants (and really, I think few nations can say they weren't at some point in their history) at some point we have to get along with the idea of moving forward instead of revering the past.

Since this followed the post about naming and specifically mentioned the black community and the example referenced was a Nigerian family (presumably black) I surmise that is what brought the issue of respect forward. I have to admit that, in respect to that, I have had very few contacts with black people on a sustained level. It's one of the reasons I write so few black characters because I think I am under qualified to represent them in anything but the flattest way. There are a lot of small items, which could be filed as cultural, that one has to be aware of to accurately portray any group of people, at least in a general sense. For instance if you are a Star Trek fan the idea of a pacifist Klingon simply doesn't make sense. As someone raised in a white community I have little sense for black societal mores, etc. Keep in mind this is in a broad sense as well, considering that not everyone is brought up the same regardless of skin color, etc.

In the Navy one of my instructors was black and at one point he was giving us a lecture about the Navy being a collection of Americans from all walks of life. Addressing the black members in the group he noted that some things would have to be left behind, such as the notion that white people smelled like wet dog. I was confused, but as I glanced around the room I saw many of the black servicemen grinning at the reference that they had grown up with. It's things like that, real details that make it difficult to write about thing you simply don't know; I think in that respect you can only entertain people as ignorant as yourself or they enjoy seeing you put in print just how little you know.

So I guess the 'point' of this rambling note was that I didn't understand your note but decided to answer them in the ways that it occurred to me you might have meant. I probably got it all wrong.

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I've been thinking about this off an on for a while, wasn't sure how to take it since so much depends upon the perspective of whomever is reading the statement. I readily admit to being ignorant of many different cultures, but frankly I'm not all that troubled by it. I don't think anyone could paint an accurate picture, for instance, of the American Culture. Sometimes just crossing to another side of town changes that completely. Also something being part of a 'culture' doesn't automatically make it good or worthy of respect; I think that is far more individual. For instance, I have zero respect for the cultural rules that say eating a dog is okay or good for your sex life. Seeing them stacked on atop the other with their all too intelligent eyes peering from the wire cages outside restaurants simply infuriates me. But then, I'm weird, as I don't particularly like seeing even lobsters in a tank for people's choosing, especially since I found out they have been recorded screaming in the water as thy are cooked alive. Simply being a part of a culture isn't a good reason, to me.

Then there is the humor angle. Humor is so dicey, since it often revolves around someone's misfortune; in this instance of not understanding the language in the country they apparently live in.

While we were founded as immigrants (and really, I think few nations can say they weren't at some point in their history) at some point we have to get along with the idea of moving forward instead of revering the past.

Since this followed the post about naming and specifically mentioned the black community and the example referenced was a Nigerian family (presumably black) I surmise that is what brought the issue of respect forward. I have to admit that, in respect to that, I have had very few contacts with black people on a sustained level. It's one of the reasons I write so few black characters because I think I am under qualified to represent them in anything but the flattest way. There are a lot of small items, which could be filed as cultural, that one has to be aware of to accurately portray any group of people, at least in a general sense. For instance if you are a Star Trek fan the idea of a pacifist Klingon simply doesn't make sense. As someone raised in a white community I have little sense for black societal mores, etc. Keep in mind this is in a broad sense as well, considering that not everyone is brought up the same regardless of skin color, etc.

In the Navy one of my instructors was black and at one point he was giving us a lecture about the Navy being a collection of Americans from all walks of life. Addressing the black members in the group he noted that some things would have to be left behind, such as the notion that white people smelled like wet dog. I was confused, but as I glanced around the room I saw many of the black servicemen grinning at the reference that they had grown up with. It's things like that, real details that make it difficult to write about thing you simply don't know; I think in that respect you can only entertain people as ignorant as yourself or they enjoy seeing you put in print just how little you know.

So I guess the 'point' of this rambling note was that I didn't understand your note but decided to answer them in the ways that it occurred to me you might have meant. I probably got it all wrong.

I agree with the tone and texture of this. There is something here, however, that I discount when writing. If I didn't, I couldn't write anything.

This suggests, and probably not intentionally, that cultures are monolithic, at least to a degree. If I felt that way, I couldn't write about any group but white Americans; but think about that for a second or two. White Americans raised as Lutherans in Minnesota, say, are much different in many cultural aspects from the same group raised as Baptists in Mississippi.

The same holds, quite obviously, for blacks and Asians and any other cultural identity one wishes to assign to a group. I met many blacks, and mostly for the first time, when I went to college, and I found them as disparate a group as any of my friends. There were similarities in sub-groups, however. The black athletes were much more like the white athletes than they were like black intellectuals, unless they were athletes with high GPAs.

One thing that makes writing fun, and as I say, possible, is that people are so different. I know a lot of people would like to think of gay men as a monolithic group, all feeling and acting the same as each other. We here certainly know how wrong, even how silly, that notion is.

C

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Guest Dabeagle

Mmm, well, I wasn't trying to imply that each group is the same, ie all blacks act alike, etc. More that i felt I was lacking in enough information to do the character justice. But then maybe I'm lazy.

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