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Nigel Gordon

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    1,189
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About Nigel Gordon

  • Rank
    AwesomeDude Author
  • Birthday 08/17/1948

Contact Methods

  • Skype
    nigelgbackhurst

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Leicester England
  • Interests
    Bookbinding, Cooking, Theatrical Magic, Aikido, Kijuryu Atemi Jutsu, Mathematics, Science, Computers, Politics, History, Paganism, Environmentalism and Gaia

Recent Profile Visitors

6,203 profile views
  1. Saw this in Dude Picks and decided to read it again. It has been five years since I originally read this story. Read it again in one sitting today and as before it had me in tears. This is a great story, well told my a master story teller. It is also a great piece of writing, which is well worth reading. If you have not read it, I recommend that you do. If you have read it in the past, it is well worth reading again.
  2. In Gay Authors there are two buttons A+ and A- they are in a bar at the top of each chapter. A+ increases the text size. The other buttons allow toggling between light and dark background and adding paragraph indents. If the text is tiny you probably have it set to A- so just hit A+ several times until it is big enough. Yes but the formatting goes haywire making the text unreadable. Could only see half a line of text at a time then had to scroll right. The scroll left to see the start of the next line.
  3. I would love to read this story but find reading anything on Gay Authors impossible. Even on my iMac with at 27" monitor, the text is so small as to be hardly readable for me. I know I can increase the text size in the browser by using Command Shift + but at the maximum it gets too on Gay Authors, it is still to small for me to read easily and the formatting is crap. Do you know if the story has been posted anywhere else?
  4. Today, the 15th of April, is the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Belsen. Unlike Auschwitz, it was not a death camp, there were no gas chambers, but still thousands died there. They died because of prejudice. Because men and women were not prepared to accept that others might have a different lifestyle or belief system to them. My friend Henk was lucky, he arrived in Belsen only a couple of weeks prior to its liberation. The sights he saw there never left him, neither did the memory of the stench arising from the piles of rotting corpses that strew the camp grounds. Henk had been denounced for anti-social behaviour just over a year before his arrival in the camp. He was gay. He was sent to a labour camp building the Atlantic Wall. When the allies advanced towards the Low Countries, they were moved inland to other camps, eventually arriving at the end of March 1945 in Belsen. He was one of the many in the camp who wore the pink triangle. On the 15th of April, the Allied troops, mostly British, arrived and liberated the camp. That did not bring Henk freedom. Immediately after its liberation the camp was quarantined due to the outbreak of Typhus in the camp. Then, eventually Henk was repatriated to his homeland. That though did not mean freedom. As he had been found to be a homosexual he was deemed to be a criminal and imprisoned for the remainder of the sentence originally imposed by the Nazi court. My first ever story on AwesomeDude, Remember ( http://awesomedude.com/nigel_gordon/remember.htm), was based on Henk and what he told me about camps he was in. Don't let us ever forget the Holocaust was not just about the persecution of the Jews. It was also about the persecution of the Roma, Sinti, Jehovah Witnesses, and many other groups, including LGBTQ. The gays may not have been sent directly to the gas chambers (though some were). They were though worked to death, and those that survived the labour camps found their way to places like Belsen where they were just left to die. If you want to know more about conditions in Belsen listen to Richard Dimbleby's report on it: Above all, let us not forget the horror that he saw there or gay men and women who suffered there.
  5. The rains haven't come and the grasslands are brown with drought. There has been no sign of the great herds which the tribe normally hunts. Now they must hunt a solo bull Auroch, the feared great cattle of the stone age. It is though necessary as the tribe must have meat if they are to survive the trek through the mountains to their winter abode. This short story should be appearing soon.
  6. I love this story, the way the scene is set up, the way it is told and the ending are all pure Cole. I always like his writing but in my opinion he is at his best in his short stories and this is one of the best he has written.
  7. A great start that indicates an interesting story to come.
  8. I hate this story, it's got me stuck back in Rothenia and now I need to go and read all the other stories in the series once more. This always happens when Michael posts one of his stories. I should know better and leave them well alone. Unfortunately, I am addicted to Rothenia and all its goings on, so I can't resist reading anything Michael posts. That nearly always leads me to re-reading all his other connected works.
  9. A beautiful story, well told. Really enjoyed reading it.
  10. I admit I am biased, but I have always loved Pedro's writing.
  11. After twelve and a half years in prison for murder, Edward Chapman is released on bail pending retrial, after DNA evidence cast doubts upon his conviction. The problem for Edward is that he has a past, one which seems to want him killed. To complicate matters he also has a secret. He also finds out that he has a son, a kid named Joey. A story in 18 chapters, hopefully the first part of a trilogy.
  12. I have just finished the second draft of a novel. At the moment it is with an alpha-reader. I need an editor, who is a glutton for punishment. The novel is 122 chapters and approximately 500,000 words. It is written in British English but there are parts of the dialog which are in dialect. If anyone is prepared to take on trying to edit this please let me know.
  13. Having spent a day re-reading 'The Scholar's Tale', this morning I re-read 'A Time'. Even though I know how the story is going to go, it does not help. I always end up in tears every time I read it. So, why read it? Because Mihangel is a really good writer who writes really good stories. As Cole says, 'Anyone not having read his large output is in for a wonderful treat'. I would go further and say those who, like me, have read it, will be in for a treat when they re-read it.
  14. This story has appeared on the BBC News pages. It is really rather touching: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/newsbeat-50584688
  15. This story owes a lot to the work of Pedro. I had completed the first draft and was dealing with some comments on it, when I was hospitalised. I emailed Pedro and asked him to complete the edit and implement any changes that were necessary, there were quite a few. All of which he did, and he submitted it to Mike for me. Unfortunately, he did not do the one thing I specifically asked him to do, which was to add his name to the story.
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