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Graeme

Useful Links

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Editors, like writers, use a number of resources to help them with their tasks. I'm starting this thread to allow useful links to be shared.

Being selfish, I'm starting with one that's dear to my heart, the differences between American and British (and Australian) English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_...ish_differences

Graeme

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Being selfish, I'm starting with one that's dear to my heart, the differences between American and British (and Australian) English:

Graeme

The main difference is that Americans don't SPEAK English. But thanks for the link. Since I don't have editors, I have to muddle through on my own with research and such, and find my own mistakes. Which explains a lot, I know.

Kisses...

TR

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I'm in the same boat...when i write, I do my own editing, mostly as I go but with some post-first draft revision. In some ways I like it, because there's no one guessing what i mean (except the readers--lol) and I can do the corrections the way I want to have them done.

On the other hand, little errors creep in when it's all just me looking at the text, and sometimes I wish i had another set of eyes checking for stuff.

cheers,

aj

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Editors, like writers, use a number of resources to help them with their tasks. I'm starting this thread to allow useful links to be shared.

Being selfish, I'm starting with one that's dear to my heart, the differences between American and British (and Australian) English:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_...ish_differences

Graeme

(1) Try using TINYURL.COM which turns that unweildy mess into: http://tinyurl.com/4ezjg

(2) Wikipedia is really cool but there are often very serious errors. And on a topic like this it doesn't matter but be careful using it for scholarly work and other things without double checking your facts. I use it too, but that's a friendly word of warning :)

(3) It's a subject that is obviously near and dear to my heart as well. I am an American an I speak American English. American English is a bastardization of the Queen's English (or British English). As Twain (I believe once said): we are two very similar countries seperated by a common language. It's not just the spelling (color v colour /or/ encyclopedia v encyclopaedia) but the punctuation (inside or out of the quote marks) and even the diction (in the hospital v in hospital). I could go on for HOURS. Which is probably why many of my readers think I'm English. Until they hear my accent.

-- wbms

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Sounds like these two guys need to get together for a little mutual... er proofing?

:p

If your looking for volunteers to do the proofing, then let me be the first to volunteer.

:twisted:

If you or anyone else is interested, I'm curious about the benefits of an Editor. If someone would like to proof/edit/comment on Der Cowboy (link on front page), I'd appreciate it. Not only do I have a lot of trouble catching some of the more glaring mistakes that occur in a bigger project, I'm fascinated by the idea that someone could help me to be a better writer by editing. I started writing last summer, in late July, and am still trying to find my voice, my TR self, and welcome assistance to that end. If you need the story in an rtf file, just let me know in PM.

Kisses...

TR

http://www.awesomedude.com/stories/short_s...er%20Cowboy.htm

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Tragic Rabbit:  I'm fascinated by the idea that someone could help me to be a better writer by editing.

It depends on how you view the editing process, TR. If you think that having the story edited and finally proofed by someone else is just to make it "prettier" for the reader, then it probably won't help.

But if the author and editor work as a team, each with the proper respect for what the other does, it can be a great help. While many authors have a good grounding in English grammar and usage, others do not. Some authors may have terrific ideas which, if presented well will make for a good story. Other authors blessed with a good grounding in the written language may, alas, be totally uninspired when it comes to weaving a tale.

A pairing of the "right" editor and author can contribute to enhancing the skills of both.

Each editor/author relationship is -and must be- different. Some teams soar. Others flop. Some lead to longtime friendships, others to animosity. I happen to know that there examples of most of these right here on AwesomeDude. Except for the flops... they seldom make it to our pages as we don't have an "Examples of what NOT to do Stories section.

With apologies to The Bard, The Story's The Thing.

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