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British Whats Are Bigger?


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According to the current affairs quiz show Wait Wait, Don't Tell Me, on America's National Public Radio, studies show that British men's feet have grown on average two sizes over what they were forty years ago. The average size of a British man's foot is now size eleven. The MC, Peter Sagal remarked, "And you know what they used to say about foot size! Now, if you meet a man with big feet, he's probably got terrible teeth and he's vaguely pear shaped."

I assume this does not apply to our British AD friends!

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There almost certainly are people with centimeter fetishes.

I remember when yahoo groups was a thing, there was one for 'pictures of guys with small equipment'.I'd hang out there because there'd be some cute, fit guy pics, but there really were some centimeter-looking organs.

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Attention Awesomedude forum,

I was recently contacted by the attorneys of Mr. Tom Daley who became aware of out thread. They said that Mr. Daley finds our discussion of him inappropriate, prurient, perverted and immature. In light of this, Mr. Daley has forwarded the following personal message:

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  • 4 weeks later...

England uses the metric system in most cases.

Exceptions:

Height of a person (feet, inches)

Weight* of a person (stone, pounds)

Speed of vehicles (miles per hour)

Distance of roads (miles)

Yards are gone, only existing in archaic signs. Metres are used for most distances, except on road signs. Killigrams and metric tonnes are used for weight.

* properly it should be mass, but oh well.

I like Tom Daley. I thought he was gay before he came out. Then again, he does wear speedos for his job...

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Wot? Yards are gone, you say?

An English archer drawing a cloth-metre arrow? Nonsense.

The Royal Navy hanging someone from a metre-arm? Nay.

Quaffing a metre of ale? Rubbish. 2 1/2 imperial pints will never be 1.4 Liters. That sissy measure is for Frenchy wine.

Metre is for poetry.

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Be very careful though. Imperial gallons (ie the true ones) are different to US gallons and that is both of them - wet and dry.

Oddly, I weigh myself in kG, but measure my height in feet and inches. But as I was taught imperial in my first school, and was expected to know and use the metric system in secondary school, perhaps not that surprising.

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Nick, you've got me thinking. I can't come up with a single thing measured dry in gallon containers. I've always thought of gallons as being liquid measures. The closest I can come to a solid measured in gallons would be ice cream, and that's not really dry even when frozen.

Can anyone think of something that's measured in gallons that's dry?

C

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Not sure you'll find anything to be honest. Although the measure exists, it's a bit of a daft one. According to the paragon of truthfulness, Wikipedia (yeah right), it's not used.

Some market traders, and pubs in the UK will sell you a pint of prawns which is the nearest I've come to a liquid measure being used for dry goods. As I'm a bit of a sucker for seafood, I have had it a few times for lunch.

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Imperial measures of capacity: 8 gallons = 4 pecks = 1 bushel = (of course) 2815.5 cubic inches. Obsolete here, but evidently still current in the States. I have a correspondent in Oregon who has a prolific walnut tree that, he tells me with pride, produces around 70 gallons of walnuts a year.

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Nick, you've got me thinking. I can't come up with a single thing measured dry in gallon containers. I've always thought of gallons as being liquid measures. The closest I can come to a solid measured in gallons would be ice cream, and that's not really dry even when frozen.

Can anyone think of something that's measured in gallons that's dry?

C

From Wikipedia 'Dry measure' article:

"Because it is difficult to measure actual volume and easy to measure mass, many of these units are now also defined as units of mass, specific to each commodity, so a bushel of apples is a different weight from a bushel of wheat (weighed at a specific moisture level). Indeed, the bushel, the best-known unit of dry measure because it is the quoted unit in commodity markets, is in fact a unit of mass in those contexts."

It's not gallons, but it is U.S. dry measurement. Especially wheat and other similar commodities.

Colin :icon_geek:

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