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Tanuki Racoon

Curiosity Question

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Do any of the Awesomedude authors NOT use editors?

I use editors and some are okay and some are good. But I still use more than one and plan to continue the practice. Everybody catches different things. And when I have doubts if all the editors say it sucks, then it probably sucks. It's more complicated than that, but you get the idea.

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I edit my own stuff, when I do write--which ain't that often, quite frankly. I know the rule is that you're supposed to get the whole thing out on paper (geez, am I ever dating myself here!) and then go back through and revise, but I tend to revise as I go. Each time I open the file to write some more, I read the whole thing with a very critical eye and make corrections before I resume writing new stuff. This is undoubtedly why it takes me for-frickin'-ever to write a story, but damn is it ever well edited when i'm done with it. :roll:

cheers!

aj

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I have the occasional short story that I don't have edited. Ambush was one of those. Most, however, I'll get edited. I tend to only have one editor per story, but I use different editors because I don't want to overload Wonderboy (aka Mr. Picky, or Aaron) as he enough on his plate already.

Graeme

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The author I started out with hasn't sent me anything to for awhile. And I already know why another one isn't doing any, or much writing, at the moment.

I am currently waiting on the next chapter of Collision to come my way.

Other than that, this editor is BORED.

J

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Do any of the Awesomedude authors NOT use editors?

Gabe and I did some mutual editing a while back, but mainly I use no editor other than myself. Which may explain a lot...

TR

Sigh..that was me, not logged in. I am so not happy with all this...

Sniffle.

TR

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I basically edit myself, but I still try to run my 1st drafts through a small group of friends. They spot the stupid errors I miss (the "can't see the trees for the forest" principle), and also smack me upside the head when there's a looming plot problem.

Nothing beats having a second pair of eyes. That having been said, a good reference for info is:

SELF-EDITING FOR FICTION WRITERS: How to Edit Yourself into Print

by by Renni Browne & Dave King

published by Collins Books (ISBN #0060545690)

I learned a lot from this one, but I also found it's too easy to overlook non-obvious errors -- particularly spelling or grammatical errors where the word is spelled right but it's the wrong word by meaning.

--Pecman

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Nothing beats having a second pair of eyes.

Maybe so, but my experience is that editors don't return your stuff to you, with the exception of the times Gabe has proofed for me. Maybe no one else can stomach my writing style.

Dude is always after me to stop sending him repeated revisions after he's already posted...a side effect of no editor. Occasionally, a reader has proofed for me, though I do think that proofing and editing aren't the same thing-I just have no experience with the latter.

I'd prefer having an editor, actually, as I'm told it improves your writing.

TR

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Maybe so, but my experience is that editors don't return your stuff to you, with the exception of the times Gabe has proofed for me. Maybe no one else can stomach my writing style. I'd prefer having an editor, actually, as I'm told it improves your writing.

If your editors don't return your stuff you have suck-ass editors. I've had a few of those and they are not happy things. But as you say it DOES improve your writing, forcing you to be on your toes.

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Are these editors you have professional editors, or simply people who are good with written English and willing to take some time to go over your works?

I know an editor in a huge publishing house, and she is very knowledgeable but I cannot see that you would be able to avail yourselves of that calibre unless you were publishing for money, and doing well with the sales of your books. Since gay teen romance is not a particularly huge financial windfall, as yet, I would imagine most of the editors are friends with competence.

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I haven't used an editor, but I'm sure any stuff would be better if I did.

The main prob from my view point is the difference between American speak and English speak.

If I had an American editor for instance, he/she would have a nightmare on their hands. I would too probably when it got returned converted to American speak. :(

If you understand all that you are better than me :grin: . Net result I suppose, I continue without any editing assistance.

Hugz...Rick...PS. This is posted as a guest btw, because signing in doesn't work any more. :?

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The main prob from my view point is the difference between American speak and English speak. If I had an American editor for instance, he/she would have a nightmare on their hands. I would too probably when it got returned converted to American speak.  :(  ?

Horseshit. You just need a billingual editor :) I am fully conversant in UK and US English (and anyone who thinks they're the same is daft). And most people can handle it easily if they understand the nuances between the two.

Where Americans normally get hung is on plural singular nouns: EG:

The BBC are announcing <--- proper UK

The BBC is announcing <--- proper US

Of course when you get to slang is where you have the problems, but most rules of diction, spelling, and grammar are easily learnt (learned to a US person) quickly.

My two cents :)

(And for the record I have one editor who is American and one who is Swedish. I am an American who writes either in US English --ADIP-- or UK English --AWMS. Oddly, most of my readers think I'm English.)

So there.

Merry Christmas :D

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The main prob from my view point is the difference between American speak and English speak. If I had an American editor for instance, he/she would have a nightmare on their hands. I would too probably when it got returned converted to American speak.  :(  ?

Horseshit. You just need a billingual editor :) I am fully conversant in UK and US English (and anyone who thinks they're the same is daft). And most people can handle it easily if they understand the nuances between the two.

Where Americans normally get hung is on plural singular nouns: EG:

The BBC are announcing <--- proper UK

The BBC is announcing <--- proper US

Of course when you get to slang is where you have the problems, but most rules of diction, spelling, and grammar are easily learnt (learned to a US person) quickly.

My two cents :)

(And for the record I have one editor who is American and one who is Swedish. I am an American who writes either in US English --ADIP-- or UK English --AWMS. Oddly, most of my readers think I'm English.)

So there.

Merry Christmas :D

Do you use the OED a lot WBMS? I think it's a pretty cool collection, and useful for some things, though I prefer American dictionaries like MW... Oxford makes some great translation dictionaries...

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I can certainly understand how an author would feel about an Amercian editing their work. I'm the Project Editor for Collision. Graeme did chapter 2. When doing the edit, I pointed out a couple of places where most americans wouldn't speak the way he wrote the phrase's. Needless to say, he was a little irritated with me. But once it was understood the story takes place in Springfield, Anywhere, USA, it was changed.

Having read Graemes stories and knowing he lives in Austrailia, had Springfield been located in Austriailia, or England, I wouldn't have pointed these phrases out.

I assume that what an author writes, takes place in his/her home country, unless told otherwise.

And brit18uk, when I edit a story for someone, I offer suggestions and comments back to the author. I don't make the changes, I leave that up to the author. I feel I don't have the right to change anything. It's up to the author to choose and make the change if they want.

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Do you use the OED a lot WBMS?  I think it's a pretty cool collection, and useful for some things, though I prefer American dictionaries like MW...  Oxford makes some great translation dictionaries...

I own a print copy of the OED Second Edition. Sometimes, I just browse through and read random entries in the dictionary. I accept that fact makes me geeky and weird and I don't care. The OED is the final arbiter in all disputes in the English language though it IS missing some common words. (Bimbo wasn't in until recently and geas is still missing which irritates me.)

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If I'm looking at a dictionary for possible purchase, I always check for the word 'tesseract'. If it is missing, I don't buy it. If it is there, I'll at least consider a purchase.

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Most online fiction, including gay fiction or fan fiction, is edited by volunteers who may have various strengths in proofing, editing, grammar, continuity, characterization, and plotting. Many who edit or beta-read are also authors. Some editors and betas have real-world jobs as writers and/or editors.

Please keep in mind that editors and beta readers for online fiction have real-life circumstances which can and do interfere with scheduling. However, they should let the authors for whom they're editing know when possible that a delay may be forthcoming.

Authors may request an editor (or more than one) and editors may volunteer their time too.


Regarding major English dialects (American, British, Australian, etc.):

That depends on how well versed a writer, reader, or editor is in another dialect. It's best for anyone who isn't native or fluent in another region's dialect to double-check any cases where the person is unsure of corrections in vocabulary or idiomatic expressions. Someone reasonably well read should recognize many of the differences as a matter of course.

It can be a really fun and enriching thing to edit for someone overseas.

Speaking as an editor, it is the editor's responsibility to stick with the dialect in which the story is set and in which the author is writing. Therefore, this American editor has had to remember appropriately international differences, both when an international writer was writing a "foreign" story, and when writing for an American setting. The mix-ups can be thought-provoking as well as really funny.

In other words, a good editor shouldn't mangle the author's dialect unless it's necessary for the target region.


WBMS used the example of a "collective plural."

The BBC are announcing <--- proper UK

The BBC is announcing <--- proper US

The American logic treats a group as a single entity, unless members of the group are acting as individuals.

The British logic treats any group as plural entities acting together.

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And brit18uk, when I edit a story for someone, I offer suggestions and comments back to the author. I don't make the changes, I leave that up to the author. I feel I don't have the right to change anything. It's up to the author to choose and make the change if they want.

I correct and mark up misspellings and typos. For other points, particularly if something is unclear or seems wrong, story-wise, I mark it up and make a suggestion. I also make comments, where appropriate, on how something struck me. The author then approves changes and discusses any problem points, and it continues until both are satisfied. When an author changes something, that must be rechecked also, in the same way.

A good editor does give-and-take with the author. Most things, the author will be fine with, or will change after discussion. Some, the editor needs to stick to his guns, but that can only go so far. Ultimately, it is the author's story.

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Hi, Rick,

I've used two USA based editors for my two main stories (Aaron for New Brother, and Blue for Falls Creek Lessons). Both managed the Australianism's (which are largely the same as the British ideosyncracies) with little problem. I sometimes have to put my foot down on the changes, but that is rare (Aaron had no idea what the phrase "seventy, not out" meant... which I was expecting. For some reason, Cricket has never taken off in the USA).

I had the reverse problem when I wrote my chapter of Collision, as Jan pointed out. I thought I'd caught all the Australian phrasing, but he picked up on several that I'd missed.

So, don't be afraid to use a USA based editor. There may be a learning curve initially, but a good editor will pick up the differences fairly easily. There are also some good references available on-line to help:

American and British English Differences

That is a link I've posted before, and it may not be perfect, but it is a very good start.

Graeme :grin:

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Oddly, most of my readers think I'm English.)

I have to admit that I did in fact mail you complimenting you when you first posted "Alone By Myself". I do distinctly remember remarking on the fact that you appeared to be English. Your reply very quickly dispelled that notion.

Hmmm! Maybe you are right. Could be I am just too new at this. :)

Hugz...Rick

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When it comes to misspelled words or typo's, I now highlight in a different color. I changed a misspelled word once and failed to highlight it. I did mention the change. The author was unhappy with me because he misspelled the word on purpose and had to go back and find the word.

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I'm really enjoying this exchange. Like Jan, I highlight suggested changes in a different color than the standard text...I'm so proud of myself for writing a Macro on Word that automatically changes the color of a highlighted word to my standard green with the push of one button. Ok, so it's not rocket science, but I take my little ego boosts where i can get them. :roll:

It's been my experience that the best author/editor partnerships happen when both participants can set aside their egos and work for the good of the piece of work. It's not an easy thing to accomplish, but when it happens, amazing things can happen.

cheers!

aj

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